Year of Engineering 2018

Year of Engineering 20182018-09-10T11:15:19+00:00

The Year of Engineering is a government campaign which celebrates the world and wonder of engineering. From spaceships to ice skates, the bubbles in chocolate bars to lifesaving cancer treatment, engineering touches every part of our lives.

Issues facing the engineering sector posterOver the course of the year, young people will have the chance to take a closer look at engineering and the variety of opportunities on offer. As part of this initiative, engineering companies are delivering open days, talks and activities happening across the country.

For further information, visit yearofengineering.gov.uk or search #YoE on Twitter.

Year of Engineering schools’ hub

The Year of Engineering schools’ hub provides teachers with a library of resources including lesson ideas, competitions, videos and more. The resources are designed to help schools get involved with the Year of Engineering and to and inspire students aged 7-16 to think differently about engineering.

Year of Engineering

Primary Engineer Wiltshire Training

Calling all Engineers!

Primary Engineer are delighted to invite you to attend a local training day taking place at Qinetiq on 26th September 2018.

Primary Engineer provide STEM CPD training to teachers which links practical maths and science to design technology and engineering projects. They see the benefit of linking Engineers like yourself with local primary schools – to not only inspire and educate young people, but also to create future generations of engineers.

For more information and to book visit our events page.

Women in Engineering Day – Wiltshire Case Studies

Members of the Employment and Skills Service had the pleasure of meeting with three female engineers to talk about their journeys into engineering and how they seek to promote engineering to more women. Read Rhiann, Charlotte and Vikki’s full stories on our news page.

Specialist Engineering University take school-leavers without A-level maths or physics

Last week, Britain’s first specialist engineering university, New Model in Technology and Engineering (NMiTE), announced it would take school-leavers without A-level maths or physics to boost the number of female students, when it opens in 2020.

NMiTE believes that if we are to get a wider, more diverse range of people into engineering – something we drastically need to do – then we must reassess the demands we make of them before their careers have even begun. The university will instead accept applicants with any three A levels.

For the full story and original article visit TES.

New Schools Resources

The Year of Engineering campaign has released a new resource page for Schools – the space is dedicated to all educators, and includes everything you’ll need to get involved and inspire students aged 7-16 to think differently about engineering. This includes;

  • Lesson ideas
  • CPD
  • Space to share your experiences
  • Opportunity to connect with other people in your area

For more information and to get involved visit Year of Engineering page.

Restart your career in STEM at Dstl

Dstl, part of the Ministry of Defence, has teamed up with UK Naval Engineering Science and Technology (UKNEST) and the Women’s Engineering Society (WES) to pilot the STEM Returners programme. The programme is aimed at giving experienced science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) professionals the confidence to step back into their careers after time taking off or the opportunity to transfer into another field.

Natalie Desty from the STEM Returners programme, said:

The science and engineering industry has a shortage of skilled workers, but many highly qualified and experienced people are struggling to get back into work. We want to change employers’ perceptions of CV gaps, remove barriers to returning to work and ensure the widest possible pool of talent is being considered for jobs. For example, female professionals returning from career breaks are often underemployed, with three in five likely to move into lower-skilled or lower-paid roles.

The Dstl pilot is open to any gender and offers individuals a paid 12-week placement, where they will work on challenging projects that make a real difference to the UK’s defence and security. Successful applicants could work in areas such as platform systems, cyber and information systems, or defence and security analysis. Placements are also available with the Defence and Security Accelerator, which manages the £800 million Defence Innovation Initiative.

For more information and to read the full story visit Gov website.